Sunday, October 7, 2018

Plan for a Humming Back Yard


September and October are the best months for Fall planting here in Arkansas and I'd like to show you some of my favorite options for attracting hummingbirds.





Crossvine {bignonia} is a lovely native trumpet that can reach 30 feet long.  Give it a bit of room for glorious color in early Spring.  There will be blossoms for hummers to cruise all Summer, but the big flush only happens in Spring.


Scarlet Honeysuckle {lonicera sempervirens} is another native vine and produces stunning red to coral blossoms just as the hummingbirds are arriving in April.


This next option falls in the category of large shrub / small tree.  There are arguments for both categories.  ;-)  Red Buckeye {Aesculus pavia} will bring even lots of early Spring trumpets.


Don't worry about late snows.  They will bounce back as soon as it melts.  Total bonus is a great harvest in Autumn.  Click HERE to see ours from 2017.


For nectar in late Summer and on into Fall, Red Cypress Vine is an excellent choice.


Here in Arkansas, it is an annual, but usually reseeds itself.  In more southern areas, this one can be considered invasive.  I love the feathery foliage!  This one climbs on our back porch so the hummers are very near us as they dine.


While we are talking about annuals, verbena is a great choice for planters.


My favorite though is calibrachoa.  One of its common names is Million Bells.


Calibrachoa can be found in double as well as single form in just about every color imaginable.


I like spacing these throughout the garden so the hummingbirds can't be quite as cranky about their territory.  They sure are aggressive little birds!


Feeders are a great way to supplement nectar sources, especially during the hottest days of summer.


Of course there are tons of other plants to invite these tiny jewels into your garden.  Which ones are your favorites?  What's humming in your back yard?

;-)  -Marci

4 comments:

  1. I love hummingbirds. They usually arrive in May but depart in August before I'm ready to see them go. - Margy

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  2. Beautiful photos! I love to see Hummingbirds! Another plant to consider growing to attract them is Turk's Cap Malvaviscus.
    Have a wonderful weekend!

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  3. Hello, I love the hummers and try to plant flowers that attract the hummingbirds. Your flowers are gorgeous. I would love to have some of the scarlet honeysuckle. Thank you for linking up and sharing your post. Happy Saturday, enjoy your weekend. PS, thanks for the comment and visit to my blog.

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  4. They are lovely plants. Our climate is a bit too extreme for some of them!
    Our hummers have fled for warmer climes. My petunias are nearly done, too! I'm happy to see yours! (ツ) from Cottage Country Ontario , ON, Canada!

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